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PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis) treatment in Hong Kong

is a way to prevent HIV infection after a possible recent exposure. It involves taking HIV medications as soon as possible (within 3 days) after a single high-risk event to stop HIV from making copies of itself and spreading throughout your body. Below, we share important information about PEP from CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention):

PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) means taking antiretroviral medicines (ART) after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected.

PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after recent possible exposure to HIV. If you think you’ve recently been exposed to HIV during sex or through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs or if you’ve been sexually assaulted.

PEP - HIV Prevention Treatment

PEP should begin as soon as possible after an exposure as its protective effect is reduced if begun after 72 hours. The usual course of treatment is 28 days.

How PEP prevent HIV

It takes a few days for HIV to become established in the body following exposure. PEP drugs given at this time may help the body’s immune system to stop the virus from replicating (multiplying) in the infected cells of the body. The cells originally infected would then die naturally within a short period of time without producing more copies of HIV.

PEP Medication Research

Recent Research indicates if PEP is taken within 72 hours of exposure even HIV has already entered the body, can highly reduce an infected person's chance of being HIV positive. It is advised PEP should be taken as soon as possible within 72 hours of exposure as its effectiveness varies according to the timing of initiation. 

For PEP to be effective, the person who may have been exposed to HIV should strictly adhere to a four week drug regimen. If they do not adhere well to the daily medication doses it is less likely to work. In addition, if not taken properly they might run the risk of developing drug resistance to HIV drugs, which might affect the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment if they become HIV positive in the future. 

PEP Side Effect

The side-effects of PEP can be strong but vary from person to person. Generally, PEP can cause

1. Diarrhoea,

2. Headaches,

3. Nausea

4. Vomiting

but these side effects usually stop once the treatment is finished.

You should consult a specialised medical professional before starting the treatment to assess your risk.  If you require PEP urgently, please click the below button to contact us immediately.